Mk 4 Supra vs Mk 5 Supra

Red Mark 4 Supra
Red Mark 3 Supra
Red Mark 4 Supra (Wikipedia)
Advertisements

The Toyota Supra is a legend. That simple fact is undeniable. Since its beautiful birth in the late 70’s it has risen to be one of the most coveted cars for car people out there. The models coveted the most however is the Mark 4 edition, which featured Toyota’s legendary engine: the 2JZ engine. This twin-turbo Inline 6 engine would go down in history as the best engine to modify. Examples of the Supra tuned to insane horsepower figures aren’t hard to find, and plenty have reached 1,000 horsepower. From just six cylinders. Nonetheless, this car was nuts but was discontinued in 2002. Since that day the car has only increased in value, with low mileage models selling for six digit sums. People longed for the day that Toyota would bring the Supra name back. Little did they know, Toyota was listening and planning. (BMW also eavesdropped, but what can you do). 

History

The Toyota Supra was created in 1978 and it was based off of the Celica from the same model year. It didn’t make any waves, as it was just a longer Celica sold in Japan alone. It remained this way until the 1981 model year, when the Mark II version went out for sale. The body design took on a more modern and sporty look, albeit sporty for an economy sedan. Then in 1982 something magical happened. America got the Toyota Celica Supra P-Type, P standing for performance. This was the first time the Supra resembled any kind of performance. The P-Type didn’t add any horsepower or torque, it just made the car look less mundane. The car still went 0-60 mph in 9.8 seconds. It was still incredibly slow. That is until magical event number 2 happened. The Mark III model of the Supra came out in 1986 and it was finally its own car. No longer attached to the Celica, the Supra started to become the legend it is today. Its 3.0L I6 engine made 200 hp, and sent the power to the rear two wheels. But in 1987, the Supra got its turbocharger. This engine made 231 horsepower to the rear wheels. This is when you start to see the Supra become a true sports car. It was everything a sports car it should be: lightweight, two doors, rear wheel drive, and have a manual transmission. And the car also finally had the horsepower figure to go with the list above. But we are going to compare the 1993 model of the Supra with the brand new Supra. In 1993 the Supra became nuts. Its new design made it look like the sports car you wanted to drive. The horsepower figure became that of a true sports car competitor at 326 horses. It kept its drivetrain and its manual transmission and showcased the hyper-modifiable new 2JZ engine. The Mark IV Supra was the last model Supra produced before the new one made today. The Supra gained fame of course from it being driven and drag raced in the first Fast and Furious film. I’m sure showing it beat a Ferrari helped a bit too.

Advertisements

Comparison


1993 Twin-Turbo Supra2020 Supra
Price (1pt)$50,400$49,990
Top Speed (1pt)177 MPH155 MPH
0-60 Time (1pt)4.6 seconds4.1 seconds
Weight (1pt)3,461 lbs3,397 lbs
Horsepower (1pt)326 HP335 HP
Safety (1pt)N/AN/A
MPG (.5 pt)18 MPG (combined)26 MPG (combined)
Visual Effect (.5 pt)Classic Japanese TunerHigh Tech Sports Car
*Final Score*1.755.25

The Verdict

Well… that was unexpected. The chart has spoken, and the new Supra is indeed better that the legendary 1993 model. For starters, it costs less and it costs less in today’s dollars which is nuts. The ‘93 model however does receive some performance accolades as it does top out 27 mph faster than the new model. But after that, the Mark V takes over.  It hits 0-60 in 0.5 seconds less than the MK IV, weighs 64 pounds less, and has 9 more horsepower. Safety information on these cars are very difficult to find. The new Supra is also surprisingly fuel efficient at 26 miles to the gallon. But after its all said, I still like the old Supra more. Its tune-ability is mostly what makes it so great, as well as its simplistic sporty look. It will truly go down in history as a legend in the world of fast cars. 

Bottom Line: Stock, the newcomer wins. Modified, the legend dominates. 

Published by Notitia

Media Company and Owner of upshifts.net

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: